How To Pay Off $10,000 Credit Card Debt

How To Pay Off $10,000 Credit Card Debt

How To Pay Off $10,000 Credit Card Debt

How To Pay Off $10,000 Credit Card Debt

February 7, 2024

February 7, 2024

February 7, 2024

February 7, 2024

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how to pay off $10,000 in Credit Card Debt
how to pay off $10,000 in Credit Card Debt
how to pay off $10,000 in Credit Card Debt
how to pay off $10,000 in Credit Card Debt

Being in debt can cause large amounts of stress, especially when you have a large amount of credit card debt hanging over your head. However, it’s important to remember that you’re not alone. According to a report by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, the US has a total of $1.13T in credit card debt, rising $50 billion just last quarter. 

By implementing the right strategies, you too can get rid of these debts sooner rather than later. Keep reading to discover 13 ways of how you can pay off $10,000 credit card debt.

1. Stick To A Strict Budget 

Most people who find themselves in debt already know how they got there, but don't know how to get out. First and foremost, you need to create a budget and then stick to it. This will allow you to see where your money is going and how much you can then put towards paying off your debt each month.  

By doing so, you’ll be able to see where your money’s going and how much you can then realistically put towards paying off your debts. 

Things that you need to include in your budgets are all of your fixed and variable expenses.  Different expenses like your rent, utilities, groceries, and transportation bills are all essential to have as a part of your budget. It’s equally as important to include other debts that have minimal payments such as car insurance, student loans, and home equity loans.

After you’ve subtracted all your expenses from your total income, you’ll be left with an amount that you can dedicate towards paying off your credit card debt. Using an app like Hiatus will let you create custom budgets directly so you avoid making any budgeting mistakes and start saving money fast to pay off that debt. 

There are numerous budget strategies that will help you pay off the debt faster. For example, the 70/20/10 budget rule allocates 20% of your income to be used for savings and an extra 10% is used for debt payments.

stick to a strict budget

2. Use a Balance Transfer Or Personal Loan 

Having debts with high interest rates can take a toll on your financial well-being. Two options to make progress on these debts would be to take out a personal loan or to consider transferring your balance to a card with a lower interest rate. You’d essentially be killing two birds with one stone because you’d save money on interest and pay off your debt faster.

With a balance transfer, your debts are either transferred to a new credit card with a lower interest rate or have a 0% introductory rate that lasts for a specified period. Be sure to find out the interest rate you'll be paying once the introductory period ends as well as any balance transfer fees. 

Taking out a personal loan allows you to consolidate your debt into a fixed monthly payment. Some personal loans may have lower interest rates than credit cards which will help you save in the long run.

Being in debt can cause large amounts of stress, especially when you have a large amount of credit card debt hanging over your head. However, it’s important to remember that you’re not alone. According to a report by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, the US has a total of $1.13T in credit card debt, rising $50 billion just last quarter. 

By implementing the right strategies, you too can get rid of these debts sooner rather than later. Keep reading to discover 13 ways of how you can pay off $10,000 credit card debt.

1. Stick To A Strict Budget 

Most people who find themselves in debt already know how they got there, but don't know how to get out. First and foremost, you need to create a budget and then stick to it. This will allow you to see where your money is going and how much you can then put towards paying off your debt each month.  

By doing so, you’ll be able to see where your money’s going and how much you can then realistically put towards paying off your debts. 

Things that you need to include in your budgets are all of your fixed and variable expenses.  Different expenses like your rent, utilities, groceries, and transportation bills are all essential to have as a part of your budget. It’s equally as important to include other debts that have minimal payments such as car insurance, student loans, and home equity loans.

After you’ve subtracted all your expenses from your total income, you’ll be left with an amount that you can dedicate towards paying off your credit card debt. Using an app like Hiatus will let you create custom budgets directly so you avoid making any budgeting mistakes and start saving money fast to pay off that debt. 

There are numerous budget strategies that will help you pay off the debt faster. For example, the 70/20/10 budget rule allocates 20% of your income to be used for savings and an extra 10% is used for debt payments.

stick to a strict budget

2. Use a Balance Transfer Or Personal Loan 

Having debts with high interest rates can take a toll on your financial well-being. Two options to make progress on these debts would be to take out a personal loan or to consider transferring your balance to a card with a lower interest rate. You’d essentially be killing two birds with one stone because you’d save money on interest and pay off your debt faster.

With a balance transfer, your debts are either transferred to a new credit card with a lower interest rate or have a 0% introductory rate that lasts for a specified period. Be sure to find out the interest rate you'll be paying once the introductory period ends as well as any balance transfer fees. 

Taking out a personal loan allows you to consolidate your debt into a fixed monthly payment. Some personal loans may have lower interest rates than credit cards which will help you save in the long run.

3. Start Paying More Than The Minimum

Most people tend to make the minimum payments on their outstanding debts. Don’t be one of those people. Obviously if your financial situation calls for it then it’s understandable but if you can make higher payments on your credit cards, your wallet will thank you later. Paying the minimum won’t help make much progress towards getting rid of your debt and you’ll end up paying a lot more in interest over time. Instead, try to pay as much as you can afford each month, even if it’s just a little bit more than the minimum payment.

4. Find Ways To Increase Your Income

Finding other means of income from your standard job will help expedite your journey to paying off $10,000 in credit card debt. Selling unused items you have laying around the house, taking on a part-time job, or starting a completely new side hustle are all great ways to get a jumpstart. You can also monetize any skills or hobbies you might have by getting into freelancing work or exploring a consulting gig. 

If the timing is right, you can consider negotiating a salary increase at work if you feel like it’s deserved. The extra money earned should be put towards making higher payments for your debt.

3. Start Paying More Than The Minimum

Most people tend to make the minimum payments on their outstanding debts. Don’t be one of those people. Obviously if your financial situation calls for it then it’s understandable but if you can make higher payments on your credit cards, your wallet will thank you later. Paying the minimum won’t help make much progress towards getting rid of your debt and you’ll end up paying a lot more in interest over time. Instead, try to pay as much as you can afford each month, even if it’s just a little bit more than the minimum payment.

4. Find Ways To Increase Your Income

Finding other means of income from your standard job will help expedite your journey to paying off $10,000 in credit card debt. Selling unused items you have laying around the house, taking on a part-time job, or starting a completely new side hustle are all great ways to get a jumpstart. You can also monetize any skills or hobbies you might have by getting into freelancing work or exploring a consulting gig. 

If the timing is right, you can consider negotiating a salary increase at work if you feel like it’s deserved. The extra money earned should be put towards making higher payments for your debt.

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5. Choose A Payment Strategy

If your debts have racked up, you will need a concrete strategy in place to pay off $10k in credit card debt. Now if you only have one card then your strategy is pretty straightforward. Now if you have more than one card like most of us, there are different ways you can tackle this task.

Debt Snowball

This payment strategy focuses on paying off your debts from smallest to largest, regardless of the interest rates. To start, list all of your credit card debts in ascending order based on how much you owe. Continue to make minimum payments on all the cards except the one with the smallest balance. Instead for this one, use the extra money you have saved from your budget and allocate it towards paying off the smallest debt. Once this debt is paid off, move on to the next smallest debt until you’ve paid off all your remaining debts. 

Debt Avalanche

With the debt avalanche, you prioritize the debts with the highest interest rate first. Since this debt is the one costing you the most money, you should prioritize that debt first. Just like the debt snowball, you should still continue making minimum payments on all of your other debts in the meantime. Once you’ve paid off that card, move on to the card with the second-highest interest rate and so on. This method can help save you a lot of money in interest charges by paying off those debts with the highest interest.

Choose A Debt Payment Strategy

6. Open An Account That Offers Cash Back 

You’re still going to have to live while you pay off your $10,000 in credit card debt. Why not get money back on your necessary expenses? Some financial institutions offer checking accounts that will give you cash back up to a certain amount when making purchases using their debit card. That's right, no further debt on your credit cards and being rewarded for buying things you normally would. The cash back you get throughout the year could be put towards paying off your debts.

7. Consider Consolidation

If you have multiple credit card debts totaling $10,000, consolidating them into one loan at a lower interest rate can be an excellent way to help pay off that debt.  A debt consolidation loan is a personal loan that allows you to transfer all your debts to a single loan with a fixed interest rate. This will make it easier to manage your payments and reduce the amount of interest you pay each month. The main advantage is that you'll pay off your debts faster and at a lower interest rate.

Consider Consolidation

8. Use Cold Hard Cash

What’s worse than having to pay back $10k in credit card debt? Paying $15,000. This can happen all too easily if you continue using the cards that you need to pay off. Since you’ll already be in a hole with debt, don’t make it any bigger. Instead, start to carry more cash with you so when you need to buy something, you avoid swiping the plastic and use cash for your purchases.

9. Seek Professional Advice

Sometimes we think we know more than we actually do. The same holds true when it comes to debt management. Seeking professional advice can provide valuable insights if you can't seem to get a handle on your debt. A good place to start is Consumer Credit Counseling. They’ll be able to give you insights and tips on debt consolidation, credit counseling, or a debt management plan. Consider having a conversation with a financial advisor, especially if you have a specific goal in mind, such as buying a home or planning for retirement.

Seek Profressional Advice

10. Track Your Progress

Since paying off $10,000 in credit card debt is something that’s going to take time, it’s important that you track your progress.  Just like any financial goal, tracking your results will help you stay motivated. It may be challenging at times, but it will feel like a huge weight’s been lifted off your shoulders once you’re debt-free. 

It’s important that you celebrate some of the milestones that you reach along the way. Even if it’s just something small, it will help boost your morale and keep you motivated.

Track Your Progress

11. Negotiate With Your Credit Card Issuer

You can also reach out to your credit card issuer and try to negotiate a lower interest rate. If you have a good credit score and you've been a long-standing customer who pays bills on time, your creditor might take that into consideration and offer you a lower interest rate. In return, some banks will lower your rate by a few points which will significantly decrease the amount you pay in interest over time. Not all credit card companies will agree to the lower rates, but it doesn’t hurt to ask.

Negotiate With Your Credit Card Issuer

12. Borrow Money From Family or Friends 

This may be a sensitive subject to talk about with anyone, but if there are people who would understand it’s those closest to you. After all, your loved ones are there for you through thick and thin. You could ask for a loan from one of your family members or friends so you can make payments on your credit card debt without accumulating more interest. Make sure to discuss a repayment plan so you don’t damage your relationship with that person who’s going out of their way to help you.

13. Cut Back On Expenses

To pay off your debt quickly, you may need to cut back on your expenses. This doesn't mean you have to stop doing everything fun, but you may need to make some temporary sacrifices. Look for areas where you can reduce your spending, such as eating out, entertainment, shopping, or wasting money on unused subscription services. Hiatus is a perfect tool to see all of your recurring subscriptions and lets you cancel what you no longer want straight from the app. Use the money you save to make extra payments toward your debt.

Cut back on your expenses

14. Think About Credit Card Debt Forgiveness

Definitely not the be-all and end-all when it comes to paying off your credit card debt, but it could be considered. Credit card debt forgiveness is when there is an agreement between a lender and borrower to cancel some or all of their debt. Different lenders may forgive all of your debts or parts of it. However, there are a handful of disadvantages going this route. Your credit score can be impacted which will make it harder to borrow money in the future.

15. Withdraw From An Investment Account

This one comes last on the list because it’s something that should be considered as a last resort plan. If you invest your money in retirement plans like 401k’s or other financial vehicles like CD’s, money market accounts, you may be able to withdraw money from these accounts. Taking a 401k loan means you’re “borrowing” money that’s intended for your retirement savings account. It’s seen as a negative decision more times than not, but it won’t impact your retirement savings if you only take a small amount out and pay it back quickly.

Withdraw From An Investment Account

5. Choose A Payment Strategy

If your debts have racked up, you will need a concrete strategy in place to pay off $10k in credit card debt. Now if you only have one card then your strategy is pretty straightforward. Now if you have more than one card like most of us, there are different ways you can tackle this task.

Debt Snowball

This payment strategy focuses on paying off your debts from smallest to largest, regardless of the interest rates. To start, list all of your credit card debts in ascending order based on how much you owe. Continue to make minimum payments on all the cards except the one with the smallest balance. Instead for this one, use the extra money you have saved from your budget and allocate it towards paying off the smallest debt. Once this debt is paid off, move on to the next smallest debt until you’ve paid off all your remaining debts. 

Debt Avalanche

With the debt avalanche, you prioritize the debts with the highest interest rate first. Since this debt is the one costing you the most money, you should prioritize that debt first. Just like the debt snowball, you should still continue making minimum payments on all of your other debts in the meantime. Once you’ve paid off that card, move on to the card with the second-highest interest rate and so on. This method can help save you a lot of money in interest charges by paying off those debts with the highest interest.

Choose A Debt Payment Strategy

6. Open An Account That Offers Cash Back 

You’re still going to have to live while you pay off your $10,000 in credit card debt. Why not get money back on your necessary expenses? Some financial institutions offer checking accounts that will give you cash back up to a certain amount when making purchases using their debit card. That's right, no further debt on your credit cards and being rewarded for buying things you normally would. The cash back you get throughout the year could be put towards paying off your debts.

7. Consider Consolidation

If you have multiple credit card debts totaling $10,000, consolidating them into one loan at a lower interest rate can be an excellent way to help pay off that debt.  A debt consolidation loan is a personal loan that allows you to transfer all your debts to a single loan with a fixed interest rate. This will make it easier to manage your payments and reduce the amount of interest you pay each month. The main advantage is that you'll pay off your debts faster and at a lower interest rate.

Consider Consolidation

8. Use Cold Hard Cash

What’s worse than having to pay back $10k in credit card debt? Paying $15,000. This can happen all too easily if you continue using the cards that you need to pay off. Since you’ll already be in a hole with debt, don’t make it any bigger. Instead, start to carry more cash with you so when you need to buy something, you avoid swiping the plastic and use cash for your purchases.

9. Seek Professional Advice

Sometimes we think we know more than we actually do. The same holds true when it comes to debt management. Seeking professional advice can provide valuable insights if you can't seem to get a handle on your debt. A good place to start is Consumer Credit Counseling. They’ll be able to give you insights and tips on debt consolidation, credit counseling, or a debt management plan. Consider having a conversation with a financial advisor, especially if you have a specific goal in mind, such as buying a home or planning for retirement.

Seek Profressional Advice

10. Track Your Progress

Since paying off $10,000 in credit card debt is something that’s going to take time, it’s important that you track your progress.  Just like any financial goal, tracking your results will help you stay motivated. It may be challenging at times, but it will feel like a huge weight’s been lifted off your shoulders once you’re debt-free. 

It’s important that you celebrate some of the milestones that you reach along the way. Even if it’s just something small, it will help boost your morale and keep you motivated.

Track Your Progress

11. Negotiate With Your Credit Card Issuer

You can also reach out to your credit card issuer and try to negotiate a lower interest rate. If you have a good credit score and you've been a long-standing customer who pays bills on time, your creditor might take that into consideration and offer you a lower interest rate. In return, some banks will lower your rate by a few points which will significantly decrease the amount you pay in interest over time. Not all credit card companies will agree to the lower rates, but it doesn’t hurt to ask.

Negotiate With Your Credit Card Issuer

12. Borrow Money From Family or Friends 

This may be a sensitive subject to talk about with anyone, but if there are people who would understand it’s those closest to you. After all, your loved ones are there for you through thick and thin. You could ask for a loan from one of your family members or friends so you can make payments on your credit card debt without accumulating more interest. Make sure to discuss a repayment plan so you don’t damage your relationship with that person who’s going out of their way to help you.

13. Cut Back On Expenses

To pay off your debt quickly, you may need to cut back on your expenses. This doesn't mean you have to stop doing everything fun, but you may need to make some temporary sacrifices. Look for areas where you can reduce your spending, such as eating out, entertainment, shopping, or wasting money on unused subscription services. Hiatus is a perfect tool to see all of your recurring subscriptions and lets you cancel what you no longer want straight from the app. Use the money you save to make extra payments toward your debt.

Cut back on your expenses

14. Think About Credit Card Debt Forgiveness

Definitely not the be-all and end-all when it comes to paying off your credit card debt, but it could be considered. Credit card debt forgiveness is when there is an agreement between a lender and borrower to cancel some or all of their debt. Different lenders may forgive all of your debts or parts of it. However, there are a handful of disadvantages going this route. Your credit score can be impacted which will make it harder to borrow money in the future.

15. Withdraw From An Investment Account

This one comes last on the list because it’s something that should be considered as a last resort plan. If you invest your money in retirement plans like 401k’s or other financial vehicles like CD’s, money market accounts, you may be able to withdraw money from these accounts. Taking a 401k loan means you’re “borrowing” money that’s intended for your retirement savings account. It’s seen as a negative decision more times than not, but it won’t impact your retirement savings if you only take a small amount out and pay it back quickly.

Withdraw From An Investment Account

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Hiatus may receive compensation when you click on links associated with this Hiatus Learn Center. Hiatus is not being compensated for any application, quotation, or the purchase of any financial products.


Hiatus has partnered with MyBankTracker for our coverage of savings account products. Hiatus and MyBankTracker may receive compensation from advertisers when you click on links associated with these savings account products. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MyBankTracker does not include all companies or all savings products. 


Hiatus has partnered with CardRatings for our coverage of credit card products. Hiatus and CardRatings may receive a commission from card issuers. Opinions, reviews, analyses & recommendations are Hiatus' alone, and have not been reviewed, endorsed or approved by any of these entities.


Hiatus is not an insurer or insurance producer. Savvy is the licensed insurance producer supporting the Hiatus/Savvy program. All insurance information and underwriting is provided by Savvy and its licensed insurance partners.


Hiatus has partnered with AmONE for our coverage of personal loan products. Hiatus and AmONE may receive compensation when you click on links associated with personal loan products. In certain situations, compensation may impact where products appear on the site (including the order in which they appear). AmONE does not include all loan companies or all types of loan products.


You are being referred to ADVR LLC’s website ("Advisor") by Hiatus, a solicitor of Advisor ("Solicitor"). The Solicitor that is directing you to this webpage will receive compensation from Advisor if you enter into an advisory relationship or into a paying subscription for advisory services. Compensation to the Solicitor may be up to $2,000. You will not be charged any fee or incur any additional costs for being referred to Advisor by the Solicitor. The Solicitor may promote and/or may advertise Advisor’s investment adviser services and may offer independent analysis and reviews of Advisor’s services. Advisor and the Solicitor are not under common ownership or otherwise related entities. Additional information about Advisor is contained in its Form ADV Part 2A available here.

© 2024 Hiatus, Inc. All rights reserved

© 2024 Hiatus, Inc. All rights reserved

Advertiser Disclosure:


Hiatus may receive compensation when you click on links associated with this Hiatus Learn Center. Hiatus is not being compensated for any application, quotation, or the purchase of any financial products.


Hiatus has partnered with MyBankTracker for our coverage of savings account products. Hiatus and MyBankTracker may receive compensation from advertisers when you click on links associated with these savings account products. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MyBankTracker does not include all companies or all savings products. 


Hiatus has partnered with CardRatings for our coverage of credit card products. Hiatus and CardRatings may receive a commission from card issuers. Opinions, reviews, analyses & recommendations are Hiatus' alone, and have not been reviewed, endorsed or approved by any of these entities.


Hiatus is not an insurer or insurance producer. Savvy is the licensed insurance producer supporting the Hiatus/Savvy program. All insurance information and underwriting is provided by Savvy and its licensed insurance partners.


Hiatus has partnered with AmONE for our coverage of personal loan products. Hiatus and AmONE may receive compensation when you click on links associated with personal loan products. In certain situations, compensation may impact where products appear on the site (including the order in which they appear). AmONE does not include all loan companies or all types of loan products.


You are being referred to ADVR LLC’s website ("Advisor") by Hiatus, a solicitor of Advisor ("Solicitor"). The Solicitor that is directing you to this webpage will receive compensation from Advisor if you enter into an advisory relationship or into a paying subscription for advisory services. Compensation to the Solicitor may be up to $2,000. You will not be charged any fee or incur any additional costs for being referred to Advisor by the Solicitor. The Solicitor may promote and/or may advertise Advisor’s investment adviser services and may offer independent analysis and reviews of Advisor’s services. Advisor and the Solicitor are not under common ownership or otherwise related entities. Additional information about Advisor is contained in its Form ADV Part 2A available here.

© 2024 Hiatus, Inc. All rights reserved

Advertiser Disclosure:


Hiatus may receive compensation when you click on links associated with this Hiatus Learn Center. Hiatus is not being compensated for any application, quotation, or the purchase of any financial products.


Hiatus has partnered with MyBankTracker for our coverage of savings account products. Hiatus and MyBankTracker may receive compensation from advertisers when you click on links associated with these savings account products. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MyBankTracker does not include all companies or all savings products. 


Hiatus has partnered with CardRatings for our coverage of credit card products. Hiatus and CardRatings may receive a commission from card issuers. Opinions, reviews, analyses & recommendations are Hiatus' alone, and have not been reviewed, endorsed or approved by any of these entities.


Hiatus is not an insurer or insurance producer. Savvy is the licensed insurance producer supporting the Hiatus/Savvy program. All insurance information and underwriting is provided by Savvy and its licensed insurance partners.


Hiatus has partnered with AmONE for our coverage of personal loan products. Hiatus and AmONE may receive compensation when you click on links associated with personal loan products. In certain situations, compensation may impact where products appear on the site (including the order in which they appear). AmONE does not include all loan companies or all types of loan products.


You are being referred to ADVR LLC’s website ("Advisor") by Hiatus, a solicitor of Advisor ("Solicitor"). The Solicitor that is directing you to this webpage will receive compensation from Advisor if you enter into an advisory relationship or into a paying subscription for advisory services. Compensation to the Solicitor may be up to $2,000. You will not be charged any fee or incur any additional costs for being referred to Advisor by the Solicitor. The Solicitor may promote and/or may advertise Advisor’s investment adviser services and may offer independent analysis and reviews of Advisor’s services. Advisor and the Solicitor are not under common ownership or otherwise related entities. Additional information about Advisor is contained in its Form ADV Part 2A available here.

App

Advertiser Disclosure:


Hiatus may receive compensation when you click on links associated with this Hiatus Learn Center. Hiatus is not being compensated for any application, quotation, or the purchase of any financial products.


Hiatus has partnered with MyBankTracker for our coverage of savings account products. Hiatus and MyBankTracker may receive compensation from advertisers when you click on links associated with these savings account products. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MyBankTracker does not include all companies or all savings products. 


Hiatus has partnered with CardRatings for our coverage of credit card products. Hiatus and CardRatings may receive a commission from card issuers. Opinions, reviews, analyses & recommendations are Hiatus' alone, and have not been reviewed, endorsed or approved by any of these entities.


Hiatus is not an insurer or insurance producer. Savvy is the licensed insurance producer supporting the Hiatus/Savvy program. All insurance information and underwriting is provided by Savvy and its licensed insurance partners.


Hiatus has partnered with AmONE for our coverage of personal loan products. Hiatus and AmONE may receive compensation when you click on links associated with personal loan products. In certain situations, compensation may impact where products appear on the site (including the order in which they appear). AmONE does not include all loan companies or all types of loan products.


You are being referred to ADVR LLC’s website ("Advisor") by Hiatus, a solicitor of Advisor ("Solicitor"). The Solicitor that is directing you to this webpage will receive compensation from Advisor if you enter into an advisory relationship or into a paying subscription for advisory services. Compensation to the Solicitor may be up to $2,000. You will not be charged any fee or incur any additional costs for being referred to Advisor by the Solicitor. The Solicitor may promote and/or may advertise Advisor’s investment adviser services and may offer independent analysis and reviews of Advisor’s services. Advisor and the Solicitor are not under common ownership or otherwise related entities. Additional information about Advisor is contained in its Form ADV Part 2A available here.

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