Umbrella Insurance 101: What It Covers and Why You Need It

Umbrella Insurance 101: What It Covers and Why You Need It

Umbrella Insurance 101: What It Covers and Why You Need It

Umbrella Insurance 101: What It Covers and Why You Need It

July 9, 2023

July 9, 2023

July 9, 2023

July 9, 2023

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what umbrella insurance covers and why you need it
what umbrella insurance covers and why you need it
what umbrella insurance covers and why you need it
what umbrella insurance covers and why you need it

Unsure about umbrella insurance? Don't worry, you're not alone. Many people find it hard to fully understand but it's much simpler than you think. Think of umbrella insurance as a backup plan,  ready to help when your homeowners or auto insurance isn't enough. In this article, we'll cover everything you need to know about umbrella insurance, from what it is, how umbrella insurance works, and why you might need it.

What Is Umbrella Insurance

To put it simple, umbrella insurance is an extra layer of liability coverage. When the limits and coverages of your other policies might be exhausted, umbrella insurance will kick in to offer extra coverage and protection. Some of the common insurances that it covers are homeowners, auto and even boat insurance. It's also known as 'excess liability insurance' and provides additional protection against liability claims and lawsuits.

Umbrella insurance covers a broad range of scenarios, including physical injury to your body, property damage, certain lawsuits as well as and personal liability situations such as slander and libel. It's a comprehensive personal liability (CPL) solution designed to protect your assets from unexpected events. High net worth individuals often consider umbrella insurance to be a crucial part of their risk management strategy.

However, umbrella insurance isn't only exclusive to the wealthy. Anyone with personal assets that could b at risk in a lawsuit can benefit from this coverage. It's about safeguarding what you've worked hard to build, ensuring your financial tightrope has a strong safety net.

what is umbrella insurance

Unsure about umbrella insurance? Don't worry, you're not alone. Many people find it hard to fully understand but it's much simpler than you think. Think of umbrella insurance as a backup plan,  ready to help when your homeowners or auto insurance isn't enough. In this article, we'll cover everything you need to know about umbrella insurance, from what it is, how umbrella insurance works, and why you might need it.

What Is Umbrella Insurance

To put it simple, umbrella insurance is an extra layer of liability coverage. When the limits and coverages of your other policies might be exhausted, umbrella insurance will kick in to offer extra coverage and protection. Some of the common insurances that it covers are homeowners, auto and even boat insurance. It's also known as 'excess liability insurance' and provides additional protection against liability claims and lawsuits.

Umbrella insurance covers a broad range of scenarios, including physical injury to your body, property damage, certain lawsuits as well as and personal liability situations such as slander and libel. It's a comprehensive personal liability (CPL) solution designed to protect your assets from unexpected events. High net worth individuals often consider umbrella insurance to be a crucial part of their risk management strategy.

However, umbrella insurance isn't only exclusive to the wealthy. Anyone with personal assets that could b at risk in a lawsuit can benefit from this coverage. It's about safeguarding what you've worked hard to build, ensuring your financial tightrope has a strong safety net.

what is umbrella insurance

How Umbrella Insurance Works

Understanding how umbrella insurance works is key to recognizing its value. Picture it as a backup to your primary or 'underlying' insurance policies. When you've maxed out the limits of your homeowners or auto insurance due to a significant claim or lawsuit, umbrella insurance will come into play.

Here's an example of when umbrella insurance could kick in: Let's say you're involved in a car accident that happens to be your fault. The medical bills from the injured passengers amount to $500,000 but your auto insurance policy has a limit of $300,000 for bodily injury liability. In this case, your umbrella insurance would come into play here and cover the remaining $200,000. Without having the extra coverage, you would have to find a way to cover these costs, most likely coming out of your personal assets.

In addition to covering the overflow of costs, umbrella insurance also helps with legal defense costs. If you're sued, your umbrella policy would cover your lawyer fees, court costs, and other legal expenses, providing crucial lawsuit protection. Umbrella insurance is the financial buffer you hope you'll never need, but will be glad to have if you do.

How Umbrella Insurance Works

Understanding how umbrella insurance works is key to recognizing its value. Picture it as a backup to your primary or 'underlying' insurance policies. When you've maxed out the limits of your homeowners or auto insurance due to a significant claim or lawsuit, umbrella insurance will come into play.

Here's an example of when umbrella insurance could kick in: Let's say you're involved in a car accident that happens to be your fault. The medical bills from the injured passengers amount to $500,000 but your auto insurance policy has a limit of $300,000 for bodily injury liability. In this case, your umbrella insurance would come into play here and cover the remaining $200,000. Without having the extra coverage, you would have to find a way to cover these costs, most likely coming out of your personal assets.

In addition to covering the overflow of costs, umbrella insurance also helps with legal defense costs. If you're sued, your umbrella policy would cover your lawyer fees, court costs, and other legal expenses, providing crucial lawsuit protection. Umbrella insurance is the financial buffer you hope you'll never need, but will be glad to have if you do.

What Umbrella Insurance Covers

Umbrella insurance is designed to provide broad coverage. Besides property damage and bodily injury liabilities that result from severe car accidents or accidents at your home, it also extends to personal injuries. Often overlooked, these situations are harmful in a non-physical way and can lead to hefty lawsuits.

Here are some key areas that umbrella insurance typically covers:

  1. Bodily Injury Liability: If an accident caused by you leads to someone else's injury, umbrella insurance can cover the associated costs. This could include medical bills and potential liability claims.

  2. Property Damage: Umbrella insurance covers the cost of damage caused by you to someone else's property. For instance, if your dog causes damage to a neighbor's home, your policy could help pay for the repairs.

  3. Personal Liability Situations: These involve non-physical damages. For instance, if you're sued for libel (written defamation) or slander (spoken defamation), your umbrella policy can help cover the associated costs.

  4. Legal Defense Costs: If a covered claim leads to a lawsuit, your policy can cover your legal defense costs, regardless of the lawsuit's outcome.

Essentially, umbrella insurance provides extra peace of mind by covering a variety of incidents that could otherwise be financially devastating.

what umbrella insurance covers

What Is Not Covered By An Umbrella Policy

While umbrella insurance offers expansive coverage, there are certain situations and types of damage it typically doesn't cover. It's essential to know these exclusions to avoid misunderstandings and ensure adequate protection:

  1. Personal Belongings: Umbrella insurance does not cover damage to your own property or possessions. For this, you would need homeowners or renters insurance.

  2. Business Losses: If you own a business, any losses related to it won't typically be covered by a personal umbrella policy. A separate commercial umbrella policy would be required.

  3. Intentional or Illegal Acts: If damage or harm is caused intentionally or as a result of illegal activities, an umbrella policy will not provide coverage.

  4. Contractual Liability: Umbrella insurance generally doesn't cover liability you assume under a contract. If you've signed a contract that holds you responsible for certain risks, those would not typically be covered.

  5. Liabilities covered by other insurance: Liabilities that are typically covered by other specific insurances (like professional liability or workers' compensation) are usually not covered by a personal umbrella policy.

What Is Not Covered By An Umbrella Policy

Do You Need an Umbrella Insurance Policy?

Whether you need an umbrella insurance policy or not isn't always straightforward. Here are some of depends on numerous things your personal circumstances, the level of risk you're comfortable with, and the assets you're looking to protect.

Here are some factors to consider:

  1. Personal Risk: If your lifestyle or situation puts you at a higher risk of liability claims – perhaps you host large gatherings frequently, own a swimming pool, or have a teenage driver – umbrella insurance could provide valuable protection.

  2. Assets: The more assets you have, the more you have to lose. If your savings, property, or other assets exceed the limits of your auto or homeowners insurance, an umbrella policy will provide additional protection.

  3. Future Income: A court can order wage garnishments as part of a legal judgment. Umbrella insurance can protect your future earnings from being seized.

  4. Peace of Mind: If the thought of a large lawsuit or claim makes you uneasy, umbrella insurance can provide comfort, knowing you have an additional layer of protection.

While it's often associated with the wealthy, umbrella insurance can benefit anyone looking to safeguard their assets and financial future. It's a cost-effective way to ensure that one unfortunate incident doesn't derail your financial stability. As always, it's best to consult with an insurance professional to determine what level of coverage fits your needs and circumstances.

Do you need an Umbrella Insurance Policy

How Much Umbrella Insurance Is Right For You

Determining the right amount of umbrella insurance requires a careful evaluation of your personal situation. Things you should consider when exploring how much coverage you need:

  1. Net Worth: A key starting point is to assess your current net worth - the total of your assets minus liabilities. Consider an umbrella policy that covers at least this amount to protect your assets.

  2. Potential Risk Factors: Evaluate your potential exposure to risk. Do you own a home? Have a swimming pool? Teenage drivers? The higher the risk, the more coverage you may need.

  3. Future Income: If you're in the early stages of your career with significant earning potential, securing an umbrella policy that also considers your future income is a wise move. A lawsuit could potentially target future earnings, not just your current assets.

  4. Lifestyle: If you frequently engage in activities that could increase your liability risk, such as hosting large parties, owning pets, or leading a high-profile life, you may want to consider more coverage.

Remember, the goal of umbrella insurance is to protect your financial stability, both now and in the future. Therefore, it's advisable to reassess your umbrella insurance needs regularly or when your personal life changes significantly. As always, consulting with an insurance professional can provide tailored guidance.\

How Much Umbrella Insurance Is Right For You

Cost of Umbrella Insurance

The cost of umbrella insurance is influenced by several factors, including the amount of coverage you choose, your personal risk factors, and the insurance company you select. In general, umbrella insurance is surprisingly affordable, given the extensive protection it provides. 

For a $1 million policy, you can typically expect to pay between $150 to $300 per year. As you increase your coverage, the cost for each additional $1 million of coverage is often less than the first million.

Every insurance company has its own way of coming up with prices so it’s recommended to get quotes from multiple insurers. While the cost of umbrella insurance is an additional expense, it provides a substantial safety net. For many, the peace of mind that comes with that is worth the price.

Cost of Umbrella Insurance

How To Buy Umbrella Insurance

Purchasing umbrella insurance is a straightforward process, but it does require some preconditions and careful consideration.

  1. Underlying Insurance: Most insurers require you to have certain minimum limits on your underlying policies, such as your homeowners or auto insurance, before you can purchase an umbrella policy. These requirements vary by insurer, but commonly, you might need $250,000 to $300,000 of liability coverage on your auto policy and $300,000 of liability coverage on your homeowners policy.

  2. Choose Your Coverage: Determine how much coverage you need. Coverage typically starts at $1 million and goes up, often as high as $5 million or even $10 million.

  3. Shop Around: Different insurers have different pricing structures and requirements. It's a good idea to get quotes from several insurance companies. You might find the best deal from your existing insurer since many companies offer discounts for bundling policies.

  4. Apply: Once you've decided on a provider and coverage level, you can apply for the policy. The insurer might ask a series of questions about your property, recreational habits, employment, and other factors to determine your risk level.

  5. Policy Review: Once your application is approved, carefully review your policy to understand what's covered and what isn't. If you're unsure about anything, ask your insurer or agent to clarify.

How To Buy Umbrella Insurance

Don't Let a Drizzle Turn Into A Storm

Umbrella insurance can be an essential tool in your financial kit. It provides that extra layer of protection when your basic insurance policies aren't enough, shielding you from the financial turmoil that can come from unexpected events. Whether you're just starting your career or have built a significant asset base, it's worth considering an umbrella policy. Remember, it's not just about protecting what you have today, but safeguarding your financial future. Consult with an insurance professional to ensure you're adequately covered.

What Umbrella Insurance Covers

Umbrella insurance is designed to provide broad coverage. Besides property damage and bodily injury liabilities that result from severe car accidents or accidents at your home, it also extends to personal injuries. Often overlooked, these situations are harmful in a non-physical way and can lead to hefty lawsuits.

Here are some key areas that umbrella insurance typically covers:

  1. Bodily Injury Liability: If an accident caused by you leads to someone else's injury, umbrella insurance can cover the associated costs. This could include medical bills and potential liability claims.

  2. Property Damage: Umbrella insurance covers the cost of damage caused by you to someone else's property. For instance, if your dog causes damage to a neighbor's home, your policy could help pay for the repairs.

  3. Personal Liability Situations: These involve non-physical damages. For instance, if you're sued for libel (written defamation) or slander (spoken defamation), your umbrella policy can help cover the associated costs.

  4. Legal Defense Costs: If a covered claim leads to a lawsuit, your policy can cover your legal defense costs, regardless of the lawsuit's outcome.

Essentially, umbrella insurance provides extra peace of mind by covering a variety of incidents that could otherwise be financially devastating.

what umbrella insurance covers

What Is Not Covered By An Umbrella Policy

While umbrella insurance offers expansive coverage, there are certain situations and types of damage it typically doesn't cover. It's essential to know these exclusions to avoid misunderstandings and ensure adequate protection:

  1. Personal Belongings: Umbrella insurance does not cover damage to your own property or possessions. For this, you would need homeowners or renters insurance.

  2. Business Losses: If you own a business, any losses related to it won't typically be covered by a personal umbrella policy. A separate commercial umbrella policy would be required.

  3. Intentional or Illegal Acts: If damage or harm is caused intentionally or as a result of illegal activities, an umbrella policy will not provide coverage.

  4. Contractual Liability: Umbrella insurance generally doesn't cover liability you assume under a contract. If you've signed a contract that holds you responsible for certain risks, those would not typically be covered.

  5. Liabilities covered by other insurance: Liabilities that are typically covered by other specific insurances (like professional liability or workers' compensation) are usually not covered by a personal umbrella policy.

What Is Not Covered By An Umbrella Policy

Do You Need an Umbrella Insurance Policy?

Whether you need an umbrella insurance policy or not isn't always straightforward. Here are some of depends on numerous things your personal circumstances, the level of risk you're comfortable with, and the assets you're looking to protect.

Here are some factors to consider:

  1. Personal Risk: If your lifestyle or situation puts you at a higher risk of liability claims – perhaps you host large gatherings frequently, own a swimming pool, or have a teenage driver – umbrella insurance could provide valuable protection.

  2. Assets: The more assets you have, the more you have to lose. If your savings, property, or other assets exceed the limits of your auto or homeowners insurance, an umbrella policy will provide additional protection.

  3. Future Income: A court can order wage garnishments as part of a legal judgment. Umbrella insurance can protect your future earnings from being seized.

  4. Peace of Mind: If the thought of a large lawsuit or claim makes you uneasy, umbrella insurance can provide comfort, knowing you have an additional layer of protection.

While it's often associated with the wealthy, umbrella insurance can benefit anyone looking to safeguard their assets and financial future. It's a cost-effective way to ensure that one unfortunate incident doesn't derail your financial stability. As always, it's best to consult with an insurance professional to determine what level of coverage fits your needs and circumstances.

Do you need an Umbrella Insurance Policy

How Much Umbrella Insurance Is Right For You

Determining the right amount of umbrella insurance requires a careful evaluation of your personal situation. Things you should consider when exploring how much coverage you need:

  1. Net Worth: A key starting point is to assess your current net worth - the total of your assets minus liabilities. Consider an umbrella policy that covers at least this amount to protect your assets.

  2. Potential Risk Factors: Evaluate your potential exposure to risk. Do you own a home? Have a swimming pool? Teenage drivers? The higher the risk, the more coverage you may need.

  3. Future Income: If you're in the early stages of your career with significant earning potential, securing an umbrella policy that also considers your future income is a wise move. A lawsuit could potentially target future earnings, not just your current assets.

  4. Lifestyle: If you frequently engage in activities that could increase your liability risk, such as hosting large parties, owning pets, or leading a high-profile life, you may want to consider more coverage.

Remember, the goal of umbrella insurance is to protect your financial stability, both now and in the future. Therefore, it's advisable to reassess your umbrella insurance needs regularly or when your personal life changes significantly. As always, consulting with an insurance professional can provide tailored guidance.\

How Much Umbrella Insurance Is Right For You

Cost of Umbrella Insurance

The cost of umbrella insurance is influenced by several factors, including the amount of coverage you choose, your personal risk factors, and the insurance company you select. In general, umbrella insurance is surprisingly affordable, given the extensive protection it provides. 

For a $1 million policy, you can typically expect to pay between $150 to $300 per year. As you increase your coverage, the cost for each additional $1 million of coverage is often less than the first million.

Every insurance company has its own way of coming up with prices so it’s recommended to get quotes from multiple insurers. While the cost of umbrella insurance is an additional expense, it provides a substantial safety net. For many, the peace of mind that comes with that is worth the price.

Cost of Umbrella Insurance

How To Buy Umbrella Insurance

Purchasing umbrella insurance is a straightforward process, but it does require some preconditions and careful consideration.

  1. Underlying Insurance: Most insurers require you to have certain minimum limits on your underlying policies, such as your homeowners or auto insurance, before you can purchase an umbrella policy. These requirements vary by insurer, but commonly, you might need $250,000 to $300,000 of liability coverage on your auto policy and $300,000 of liability coverage on your homeowners policy.

  2. Choose Your Coverage: Determine how much coverage you need. Coverage typically starts at $1 million and goes up, often as high as $5 million or even $10 million.

  3. Shop Around: Different insurers have different pricing structures and requirements. It's a good idea to get quotes from several insurance companies. You might find the best deal from your existing insurer since many companies offer discounts for bundling policies.

  4. Apply: Once you've decided on a provider and coverage level, you can apply for the policy. The insurer might ask a series of questions about your property, recreational habits, employment, and other factors to determine your risk level.

  5. Policy Review: Once your application is approved, carefully review your policy to understand what's covered and what isn't. If you're unsure about anything, ask your insurer or agent to clarify.

How To Buy Umbrella Insurance

Don't Let a Drizzle Turn Into A Storm

Umbrella insurance can be an essential tool in your financial kit. It provides that extra layer of protection when your basic insurance policies aren't enough, shielding you from the financial turmoil that can come from unexpected events. Whether you're just starting your career or have built a significant asset base, it's worth considering an umbrella policy. Remember, it's not just about protecting what you have today, but safeguarding your financial future. Consult with an insurance professional to ensure you're adequately covered.

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Hiatus has partnered with MyBankTracker for our coverage of savings account products. Hiatus and MyBankTracker may receive compensation from advertisers when you click on links associated with these savings account products. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MyBankTracker does not include all companies or all savings products. 


Hiatus has partnered with CardRatings for our coverage of credit card products. Hiatus and CardRatings may receive a commission from card issuers. Opinions, reviews, analyses & recommendations are Hiatus' alone, and have not been reviewed, endorsed or approved by any of these entities.


Hiatus is not an insurer or insurance producer. Savvy is the licensed insurance producer supporting the Hiatus/Savvy program. All insurance information and underwriting is provided by Savvy and its licensed insurance partners.


Hiatus has partnered with AmONE for our coverage of personal loan products. Hiatus and AmONE may receive compensation when you click on links associated with personal loan products. In certain situations, compensation may impact where products appear on the site (including the order in which they appear). AmONE does not include all loan companies or all types of loan products.


You are being referred to ADVR LLC’s website ("Advisor") by Hiatus, a solicitor of Advisor ("Solicitor"). The Solicitor that is directing you to this webpage will receive compensation from Advisor if you enter into an advisory relationship or into a paying subscription for advisory services. Compensation to the Solicitor may be up to $2,000. You will not be charged any fee or incur any additional costs for being referred to Advisor by the Solicitor. The Solicitor may promote and/or may advertise Advisor’s investment adviser services and may offer independent analysis and reviews of Advisor’s services. Advisor and the Solicitor are not under common ownership or otherwise related entities. Additional information about Advisor is contained in its Form ADV Part 2A available here.

© 2024 Hiatus, Inc. All rights reserved

© 2024 Hiatus, Inc. All rights reserved

Advertiser Disclosure:


Hiatus may receive compensation when you click on links associated with this Hiatus Learn Center. Hiatus is not being compensated for any application, quotation, or the purchase of any financial products.


Hiatus has partnered with MyBankTracker for our coverage of savings account products. Hiatus and MyBankTracker may receive compensation from advertisers when you click on links associated with these savings account products. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MyBankTracker does not include all companies or all savings products. 


Hiatus has partnered with CardRatings for our coverage of credit card products. Hiatus and CardRatings may receive a commission from card issuers. Opinions, reviews, analyses & recommendations are Hiatus' alone, and have not been reviewed, endorsed or approved by any of these entities.


Hiatus is not an insurer or insurance producer. Savvy is the licensed insurance producer supporting the Hiatus/Savvy program. All insurance information and underwriting is provided by Savvy and its licensed insurance partners.


Hiatus has partnered with AmONE for our coverage of personal loan products. Hiatus and AmONE may receive compensation when you click on links associated with personal loan products. In certain situations, compensation may impact where products appear on the site (including the order in which they appear). AmONE does not include all loan companies or all types of loan products.


You are being referred to ADVR LLC’s website ("Advisor") by Hiatus, a solicitor of Advisor ("Solicitor"). The Solicitor that is directing you to this webpage will receive compensation from Advisor if you enter into an advisory relationship or into a paying subscription for advisory services. Compensation to the Solicitor may be up to $2,000. You will not be charged any fee or incur any additional costs for being referred to Advisor by the Solicitor. The Solicitor may promote and/or may advertise Advisor’s investment adviser services and may offer independent analysis and reviews of Advisor’s services. Advisor and the Solicitor are not under common ownership or otherwise related entities. Additional information about Advisor is contained in its Form ADV Part 2A available here.

© 2024 Hiatus, Inc. All rights reserved

Advertiser Disclosure:


Hiatus may receive compensation when you click on links associated with this Hiatus Learn Center. Hiatus is not being compensated for any application, quotation, or the purchase of any financial products.


Hiatus has partnered with MyBankTracker for our coverage of savings account products. Hiatus and MyBankTracker may receive compensation from advertisers when you click on links associated with these savings account products. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MyBankTracker does not include all companies or all savings products. 


Hiatus has partnered with CardRatings for our coverage of credit card products. Hiatus and CardRatings may receive a commission from card issuers. Opinions, reviews, analyses & recommendations are Hiatus' alone, and have not been reviewed, endorsed or approved by any of these entities.


Hiatus is not an insurer or insurance producer. Savvy is the licensed insurance producer supporting the Hiatus/Savvy program. All insurance information and underwriting is provided by Savvy and its licensed insurance partners.


Hiatus has partnered with AmONE for our coverage of personal loan products. Hiatus and AmONE may receive compensation when you click on links associated with personal loan products. In certain situations, compensation may impact where products appear on the site (including the order in which they appear). AmONE does not include all loan companies or all types of loan products.


You are being referred to ADVR LLC’s website ("Advisor") by Hiatus, a solicitor of Advisor ("Solicitor"). The Solicitor that is directing you to this webpage will receive compensation from Advisor if you enter into an advisory relationship or into a paying subscription for advisory services. Compensation to the Solicitor may be up to $2,000. You will not be charged any fee or incur any additional costs for being referred to Advisor by the Solicitor. The Solicitor may promote and/or may advertise Advisor’s investment adviser services and may offer independent analysis and reviews of Advisor’s services. Advisor and the Solicitor are not under common ownership or otherwise related entities. Additional information about Advisor is contained in its Form ADV Part 2A available here.

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Advertiser Disclosure:


Hiatus may receive compensation when you click on links associated with this Hiatus Learn Center. Hiatus is not being compensated for any application, quotation, or the purchase of any financial products.


Hiatus has partnered with MyBankTracker for our coverage of savings account products. Hiatus and MyBankTracker may receive compensation from advertisers when you click on links associated with these savings account products. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MyBankTracker does not include all companies or all savings products. 


Hiatus has partnered with CardRatings for our coverage of credit card products. Hiatus and CardRatings may receive a commission from card issuers. Opinions, reviews, analyses & recommendations are Hiatus' alone, and have not been reviewed, endorsed or approved by any of these entities.


Hiatus is not an insurer or insurance producer. Savvy is the licensed insurance producer supporting the Hiatus/Savvy program. All insurance information and underwriting is provided by Savvy and its licensed insurance partners.


Hiatus has partnered with AmONE for our coverage of personal loan products. Hiatus and AmONE may receive compensation when you click on links associated with personal loan products. In certain situations, compensation may impact where products appear on the site (including the order in which they appear). AmONE does not include all loan companies or all types of loan products.


You are being referred to ADVR LLC’s website ("Advisor") by Hiatus, a solicitor of Advisor ("Solicitor"). The Solicitor that is directing you to this webpage will receive compensation from Advisor if you enter into an advisory relationship or into a paying subscription for advisory services. Compensation to the Solicitor may be up to $2,000. You will not be charged any fee or incur any additional costs for being referred to Advisor by the Solicitor. The Solicitor may promote and/or may advertise Advisor’s investment adviser services and may offer independent analysis and reviews of Advisor’s services. Advisor and the Solicitor are not under common ownership or otherwise related entities. Additional information about Advisor is contained in its Form ADV Part 2A available here.

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